Diabetes & Prevention - Sweet Clinics

Introduction -

Diabetes is a common, chronic condition that affects the body’s ability to control sugar levels. This can be due to autoimmune damage to the pancreas (Type 1 diabetes), or due to decreased effects of insulin (a natural hormone in the body that regulates blood sugar concentrations) due to poor diet, such as in the much more common Type 2 diabetes. Both these types of diabetes are associated with a wide range of complications, such as kidney disease or diabetic eye diseases.
The most recent data on diabetes in Australia estimates that 898,800 Australians have been diagnosed with diabetes at some time in their lives. Of these, 87% had Type 2 diabetes (787,500 people) and 10% (87,100 people) had Type 1 diabetes.
People living with Type 1 diabetes represent 0.4% of the Australian population. The cause of Type 1 diabetes is not well understood, but is due to both genetic and environmental factors.
Type 2 diabetes is much more common than Type 1 and rates are higher in outer regional or remote areas than in cities. It is more common in men and in people over 35 years old. Rates of Type 2 diabetes are steadily increasing worldwide.

How diabetes affects eye health

In the United States, diabetes is the leading cause of blindness between the ages of 20 and 74. This is because diabetes can damage the tiny, delicate blood vessels that supply the retina at the back of the eye. This can in turn cause damage to the cells of the retina, which are responsible for normal sight. Disrupting normal blood flow to these cells can cause permanent blindness.

Impact on vision loss on quality of life-


Blindness is a terrible and destructive complication of diabetes. It can not only have a profound affect on all day-to-day activities, but it has also been shown to have mental health consequences – people with vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy are much more prone to conditions like depression.
While much more research is needed in this area, vision loss due to diabetes can have a wide-ranging, permanent and profound effect on quality of life. Other areas of daily living that can be strongly affected by diabetic retinopathy include reading, driving (especially at night), working, sports, socialising and self-care. People with diabetic retinopathy have reported being much more afraid of having an accident.

Diabetes and eye diseases
Eye Care General Hormones Preventative Health
Introduction
How diabetes affects eye health
Impact of vision on quality of life
Prevention
Treatment

Introduction

Diabetes imageDiabetes is a common, chronic condition that affects the body’s ability to control sugar levels. This can be due to autoimmune damage to the pancreas (Type 1 diabetes), or due to decreased effects of insulin (a natural hormone in the body that regulates blood sugar concentrations) due to poor diet, such as in the much more common Type 2 diabetes. Both these types of diabetes are associated with a wide range of complications, such as kidney disease or diabetic eye diseases.
The most recent data on diabetes in Australia estimates that 898,800 Australians have been diagnosed with diabetes at some time in their lives. Of these, 87% had Type 2 diabetes (787,500 people) and 10% (87,100 people) had Type 1 diabetes.
People living with Type 1 diabetes represent 0.4% of the Australian population. The cause of Type 1 diabetes is not well understood, but is due to both genetic and environmental factors.
Type 2 diabetes is much more common than Type 1 and rates are higher in outer regional or remote areas than in cities. It is more common in men and in people over 35 years old. Rates of Type 2 diabetes are steadily increasing worldwide.


How diabetes affects eye health

In the United States, diabetes is the leading cause of blindness between the ages of 20 and 74. This is because diabetes can damage the tiny, delicate blood vessels that supply the retina at the back of the eye. This can in turn cause damage to the cells of the retina, which are responsible for normal sight. Disrupting normal blood flow to these cells can cause permanent blindness.

Impact of vision loss on quality of life

Diabetes imageBlindness is a terrible and destructive complication of diabetes. It can not only have a profound affect on all day-to-day activities, but it has also been shown to have mental health consequences – people with vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy are much more prone to conditions like depression.top diabetologist in navi mumbai
While much more research is needed in this area, vision loss due to diabetes can have a wide-ranging, permanent and profound effect on quality of life. Other areas of daily living that can be strongly affected by diabetic retinopathy include reading, driving (especially at night), working, sports, socialising and self-care. People with diabetic retinopathy have reported being much more afraid of having an accident.

Prevention

Given the terrible lifelong consequences of uncontrolled diabetic retinopathy and its effect on vision, reducing the risk or slowing the progression of the disease is essential for all people with diabetes. People with diabetes should be screened for diabetic eye disease regularly, as well as provided with the best treatment to control their blood sugar levels and blood pressure. This can reduce risk of losing vision by as much as 95%. However, people who have good control of their sugar and blood pressure may still progress to diabetic retinopathy in the long term. Vision loss can be identified early by frequent eye examinations. By treating diabetic retinopathy or macular oedema as early as possible, further progression of the disease can be prevented. Data suggests that approximately 1 in 5 Australians with diabetes are not being screened as often as is recommended by health professionals.
Eye doctors recommend eye examinations every 2 years for people with any form of diabetes. If diabetic retinopathy is diagnosed, patients should be examined even more frequently. Some people have a higher risk of progressing to diabetic retinopathy.
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